Week 3 Task 4

Draft 2

intro:

The processes of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises so that people viewing them can expand their thinking in different ways. This means thinking in ways that they usually wouldn’t apply to visual texts. Another reason includes how it deepens peoples understandings and experience of the visual text achieving a sense of connection, or how we can apply other’s methods to our own works as a result of how much we have learnt.

Different ways of looking closely and thinking critically about a visual text produces different results; therefore expanding thinking through the use of varying methods to analyse a text. Using different approaches to a visual text such as “creative thinking, analysing, problem solving, reasoning and evaluating” (Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato and Phillipa Bright 46-47) could all come to different conclusions despite applying them all to the same text . This means they all contribute to building knowledge on the same subject, despite having different outcomes. Therefore the viewer who alternates these critical thinking methods would have a heightened understanding of what they are studying.

Using critical thinking to understand the deeper meanings behind visual texts is also important in order to uncover why something was made. This later achieves a sense of connection between the artist and audience. When looking at a visual text, context is essential in order for the viewer to deepen their understanding. Context provides reasons as to why a visual text was made the way it was, often as a reaction to things happening around the time it was made. If this is understood, the viewer will have a better understanding of the visual text they are studying and perhaps a reason behind why certain mediums and techniques were used. This inevitably achieves a sense of connection between the artist and the viewer when the reasons ‘why’ have been properly comprehended, and the meaning is successfully communicated. After all,this is the foundation for a text to exist at all, especially today where everything relieves around connectivity (Mirzoeff 5).

Analysing a visual text is important because once the text is understood, we can apply the new things we have learnt from the visual text to our own works as well as use it to improve on interpreting other’s works. This means when creating new material, other perspectives may be taken into account that weren’t before, or new mediums being explored, which shows improvement and growth. Different critical thinking methods allow us to consider more closely how and why we create, and use that to fuel inspiration for the next project.

concl:

Processes of looking closely and thinking with critique about visual texts are essential to artists and designers in order for their work to be able to be understood by others, as well as deepening their understandings of other visual texts around them. This means the artist has a better understanding of how or what to communicate any given idea.

 

Bibliography

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillippa Bright. “Critical Thinking” Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen and Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

Ruszkiewicz, et al. “reading Texts”. Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. 9-39. Print.

Mirzoeff, Nicholas.”Introduction”. How to See the World. London: Pelican, 2015.1-11. Print.

 

Week 3 Task 3

Draft 1

intro:

The processes of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises so that people viewing them can expand their thinking in ways that they usually wouldn’t apply to visual texts. Another reason includes how it deepens peoples understandings and experience of the visual text achieving a sense of connection, or how we can apply other’s methods to our own works as a result of how much we have learnt.

Different ways of looking closely and thinking critically about a visual text produce different results, therefore expanding thinking through the use of varying methods used to analyse a text. For example, using varying methods of approach to a visual text such as creative thinking, analysing, problem solving, reasoning and evaluating could all come to different conclusions despite applying them all to the same text (Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato and Phillipa Bright 46-47). Applying multiple thinking methods to a visual text means each method provides a different outcome yet they all contribute to building knowledge on the same subject. This means the viewer of a visual text who alternates these critical thinking methods has a deeper and broader understanding of what they are studying.

 

Using critical thinking to understand the deeper meanings behind visual texts is important in order to uncover why something was made which later achieves a sense of connection between the artist and audience. When looking at a visual text, context is essential to acknowledge in order for the viewer to deepen their understanding of the text. Context provides reasons as to why a visual text was made the way it was, often as a reaction to things happening around the time it was made. Many art works are produced as a result of the artist’s feelings towards a certain event happening at the time that the visual text was made, so if the viewer understands this, they have a better understanding of the visual text they are studying and perhaps a reason behind why the artist chose to use certain mediums and techniques that they did. This inevitably achieves a sense of connection between the artist and the viewer when the reasons ‘why’ have been properly comprehended.

Analysing a visual text is important because once the text is understood, we can apply the new things we have learnt from the visual text to our own works as well as use it to improve on interpreting other’s works. This means when creating new material, other perspectives may be takin into account that weren’t before, or new mediums used that the artist was otherwise unfamiliar with which all come together to show improvement from the critical thinking methods that  have been applied to other visual texts in the past.

concl:

Processes of looking closely and thinking with critique about visual texts are essential to artists and designers in order for their work to be able to be understood by others, as well as deepening their understandings of other visual texts around them. This means the artist has a better understanding of how or what to communicate a given idea.

Bibliography

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Phillippa Bright. “Critical Thinking” Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen and Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

Ruszkiewicz, et al. “reading Texts”. Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. 9-39. Print.

Annals, Alison, Abby Cannane, and Sam Cannane. “working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson Ed. N.Z., 2009. 15-39. Print.

Week 3 Task 2

Reading Comprehension: Walker Sheilagh. “Chapter seven: Conclusion. Notes to myself: Writing from the gut”. Kia tau the rangimarie: Kaupapa Maori theory as a resistance against the construction of Maori as other. Auckland University: Unpublished Master’s thesis (excerpt), 1996. 153-154. Print.

The author writes from a very personal standpoint, using pronouns such as ‘I’ and ‘me’ to connect with the reader in a relatable way, yet still incorporates a formal tone.  This allows the reader to recognise that the piece is realistic and how the writer’s integrity is woven into it. The formal tone mixed with the personalised issues being addressed in the text means the audience is more likely to take this piece seriously.

Week 3 Task 1

Writing Response: Context: Ruszkiewicz, et al. “reading Texts”. Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. 9-39. Print.

Context is an essential aspect to consider when analysing visual texts. Sometimes the context of something may reveal why something was made in the first place, which is important when looking at or thinking critically about a visual text in order to deepen the understanding of the visual text itself. Knowing this information may tell us why the artist  chose to use some of the methods and mediums that they did.

 

Week 2 Task 4

Analyse a visual text: object/item/image/space

I chose this item as my visual text to analyse as it is quite unique to where it was found (San Fran bar). This is an interesting item for me because it was created to look how it was when the photo was taken only after so many people over a period of time have contributed to how we see it now. All the stickers and graffiti combine to create a unique appearance specific to that particular fire sprinkler inlet, giving the object character. It also interests me what people think of to as; some see it as art and other see it as vandalism. Personally I think it is really interesting and full of personality, and not only the object itself but also the environment and the people that choose to go there.

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Lambert, Shannon. San Fran Bar. 2016. JPEG

Week 2 Task 3

Written response

Between the two sites visited, there are many differences to be noted as they are both such different atmospheres.

One significant difference is how different the two places are decorated. The City Gallery has a more polished and minimalistic decor, an indicator of sophistication and professionalism.  While the San Fran bar has a far more relaxed and vintage feel with a slightly edgy punk theme to it, shown through the use of textured wood, bright colours and metallic accents.

Another difference to note is the purpose for each venue. One is a quiet place for thinking and observing art works during the day whereas the other is quite the opposite; socialisation and drinking, with loud music at night.

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Lambert, Shannon. City Gallery. 2016. JPEG

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Lambert, Shannon. San Fran. 2016. JPEG

 

 

Week 2 Task 2

Field Trip Site Description and Analysis:

Site 2: San Fran Bar

IMG_2257.JPGLambert, Shannon. San Fran Bar. 2016. JPEG

The San Fran Bar located on Cuba street in Wellington serves as an ideal place for adults aged 18-30 to come and wind down with friends after a long work week, or to see live music.

The bar has a relaxed and slightly grungy appearance, shown through the use of black paint on the ceiling, walls and floor. There is also a small skeleton that is positioned in the cage above the bar that also acts as a shelf holding alcohol, adding to the grungy theme but at the same time being juxtaposed by the two bright blue walls of the venue and vintage orange tabletops. This contrast in theme comes across slightly indecisive yet harmonised by the worn in skateboard decks displaying bar specials, an ideal halfway point between the punk and vintage themes. Another aspect of the appearance of San Fran to take note of is the use of industrialised accessories, such as the rough metal used as lampshades, bar stools and how aluminium drums with flaky paint are used to create a specific atmosphere here.

An example of one of the visual languages used here is the framed array of posters along the walls of the bar. These posters communicate a relaxed mood and hint that the bar is also used to hosting musicians regularly.

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Lambert, Shannon. San Fran. 2016. JPEG

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Lambert, Shannon. San Fran. 2016. JPEG

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Lambert, Shannon. San Fran. 2016. JPEG

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Lambert, Shannon. San Fran. 2016. JPEG

Week 2 Task 1

 

Field Trip Site Description and Analysis:

Site 1: City Gallery

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LAMBERT, SHANNON. CITY GALLERY. 2016. JPEG

 

The Wellington City Gallery exists as an important venue for showcasing the finest art pieces in not only the Wellington region but in the rest of New Zealand.

The gallery allows the public to experience the pieces of art in an environment where they can think and observe in peace, as well as it being a safe place to display and archive art works for future visitors.

This building and its contents stands to represent the artistic interests of the wellington public. This target audience spans far and wide; ranging anywhere from the elderly, art curators and collectors, tourists, lecturers and students to families with children.

The use of space is to be noted the Wellington City Gallery too, both inside and out. The area outside the main entrance consists of a spacious courtyard with smaller areas of lawn. The inside area utilises the space of the multiple large rooms, to best display chosen art works while the interior layout of the building allows for a flowing route for visitors between exhibits.

I personally would come back to the gallery at some point out of interest of what is on display, or even potentially for research needed for an assignment. This is because galleries are always changing the works they exhibit, so it would be interesting to see what has changed, as well as how upstairs looks, because at the time of my visit maintenance work was being done.

 

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LAMBERT, SHANNON. CITY GALLERY. 2016. JPEG

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LAMBERT, SHANNON. CITY GALLERY. 2016. JPEG

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LAMBERT, SHANNON. CITY GALLERY. 2016. JPEG

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LAMBERT, SHANNON. CITY GALLERY. 2016. JPEG

 

 

 

Posted in: week 2 | Tagged: City Gallery, Field Trip Site Description and Analysis, Site 1

Week 1 Task 4

Reading comprehension

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato, and Philippa Bright. “Critical Thinking.” Beginning University: Thinking, Researching and Writing for Success. St Leonards, N.S.W.: Allen & Unwin, 1999. 45-61. Print.

This text gives the impression that it was written using a formal and slightly authoritative voice, as though a teacher had written it. This impression stems from the use of personal pronouns such as “you”/“your” which are used in examples to demonstrate a point, just as a teacher would address you directly when expanding upon any given concept.

The text is easily understood yet formal enough to be taken seriously, while anecdotes used to illustrate a point are simple yet vary enough to keep the reader engaged, which makes for an interesting read.

Week 1 Task 3

Writing Task: Response

During the introduction of Mirzoeff’s How to See the World, a few interesting key points are raised.

Mirzoeff compares two contemporary images; NASA’s Blue Marble (1972), and Hoshide’s ‘Untitled’ (2012) which are used as an example of how our visual culture has changed over time. For example; Blue Marble (1972) was the first image of its kind and altered its audiences perception of the world, making it what is “now believed to be the most reproduced photograph ever” (Mirzoeff 3), a demonstration of the massive impact of just one photo.

Hoshide’s “Untitled” selfie did not echo the same social interest, yet it made being in outer space even more relatable to the audience through the use of the everyday ‘selfie’ technique.

This shows us how each image’s connectivity to its audience has had such different reactions and how much the world has changed between times.